FAQs

Q?

What maintenance does my heating and air conditioning system need?

A.

Contrary to popular belief (and many marketing campaigns in our industry), the standard heating and air conditioning system requires little more than the periodic replacement of it’s filters, and having a single appliance inspected annually usually costs more than it saves.

Q?

Is it true that I have to have my furnace and air conditioner serviced annually or my warranty would be voided?

A.

Technically yes, but in practice no; that warranty clause is never enforced.

Q?

How often should I change my furnace filter?

A.

As often as it gets dirty (we think we’re hilarious, can’t you tell?). That really depends on the type of filter you are using, but the short answer is every one to three months.

Q?

What type of furnace filter should I use?

A.

This is going to surprise you, but for traditional 1” wide filters, cheaper is better for the furnace and air conditioning. As far as the furnace itself is concerned, the cheapest filter you can find is exactly what the furnace is looking for.

Q?

How long will my heating and air condition equipment last?

A.

That depends on so many variables, such as when it was manufactured, how it was installed, whether it was properly tuned when it was first started, how it’s been maintained, and if it was ever used during any construction or renovations performed on the home. As a rough ballpark, 10-30 years.

Q?

My furnace is really old (pre 1970’s). Should I replace it with a new high-efficiency furnace?

A.

Our most common recommendation is “no”, but it depends greatly on your unique situation.

Q?

Why are new high-efficient high-tech furnaces less reliable than old simple low-efficient furnaces, shouldn’t it be the opposite?

A.

It should be the opposite, but it isn’t. Old furnaces were built to last, while new furnaces are built to last for the warranty period.

Q?

I need a new furnace and I want the best, the top of the line. What type of furnace is that?

A.

The best grade of furnace manufactured is called a “Modulating Variable-Speed” furnace, and it’s usually not the best furnace to have in your home.

Q?

Ok, so if the best furnace they make isn’t the best one for my home, what grade of furnace do you recommend?

A.

As a general rule, what’s called a “Two-Stage Multi-Speed” furnace is everything you need and nothing you don’t.

Q?

I’m thinking about having air conditioning installed, but I don’t want it to cost a ton of money. What grade of efficiency should I get?

A.

This will likely surprise you, but the lowest air conditioner efficiency allowed in Canada, 13 SEER (Seasonal Energy Efficiency Rating), is nearly always the most cost-effective over the lifespan of the equipment when installed in the Calgary area.